Topic: Fauna - Rapanui North

Topic type:

RAPANUI NORTH

 

 

 

This is a short beach and includes the dune on the northern side of the Rapanui Stream.

 

 

 

2003

 

 

26.10.2003   PHO2008-324

 

While doing cliff sequencing on Rapanui South Beach, I took a couple of images looking across to Rapanui North.  The photo here shows the dune.  This is on the northern side of the Rapanui Stream which is out of the frame to the right.

 

 

4.11.2003   PHO2008-354, 368, 370-371, 1095

 

CLIFF SEQUENCING.  With the cliffs being lower than was usual at Tongaporutu, the woody vegetation zone extended further down the cliffs than at most other places.  In front of the dune there was a substantial area of flotsam logs.  Due to the weather conditions, there was a lot of salt foam, some of which was coffee coloured.

 

 

 

2008

 

 

15.12.2008   PHO2011-1473

 

As can be seen, I rarely visited this part of the coast.  An oversight perhaps, or more a case of lazyitis.  Anyway, I particularly wanted to photograph the dune, showing its location on the beach.  There was the usual logjam of logs.   Marram grass (Ammophila arenaria), was growing to seaward and other vegetation consisted of flaxes, yellow lupins (Lupinus arboreus) and coprosmas, etc.

 

Photographing from down near the wave-line, the dune appeared to have been pushed a long way back.  This appearance could however be deceptive.  The apparent change perhaps being more due to the ever-changing logs and flotsam that accumulate there.

 

 

 

2010

 

 

18.9.2010   PHO2011-1837, 1839, 1843, 1846

 

MEGA-STORM.  After having been to Te Kawau Pa and experiencing hideous conditions, I dropped in at Rapanui to record this once in a lifetime storm event.

 

Down at the dune and next to the river, and out on the beach, everywhere was awash with huge foam drifts for want of a better word.  The foam smothered logs, swamped the beach, frothed up into the dune and flew about in a frenzy.  The dune here, unlike the one on the Three Sisters Beach, still had surviving marram grass, although it was being thrashed by the screaming wind.  Some black-backed gulls dared to fly.  However, little actual flapping of wings was evident.

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